Quinoa Benefits & Easy Recipes to Manage IBS



Quinoa is a nutrient rich food that is making it's way back on the grocery shelves. The pronunciation of quinoa is (keen-wah). Although it is often referred to as an ancient grain, it is actually a seed. This is one of my favorite IBS Friendly and Low FODMAP foods. And here is why:


WHAT IS QUINOA?

Quinoa is believed to have originated in the Andean Region of South America. It is a flowering plant that is grown for its seeds, unlike wheat and barley that is grown in grasses. There are a large variety of quinoa seeds, but 3 forms are typically commercially available: White, Red, and Black seeds.


  • White Quinoa: is the most common form purchased. This is likely due to the shorter cooking time about 10-15 minutes, and a milder nutty and earthy flavor.

  • Red Quinoa: offers the same nutritional value and cooking time, but some find it a chewier texture and find the vibrant color appealing.

  • Black Quinoa: Still offering the same nutritional value. However, the black quinoa can take up to 5 minutes longer to cook and often has a stronger earthy flavor and chewier texture.

Nutrition Benefits

Quinoa is a naturally gluten free food and does not contain fructan (a high FODMAP carbohydrate that often irritates those with IBS).


Quinoa also considered a complete source of protein because it contains all the essential amino acids. So, quinoa can be the main source of protein in your dish. Quinoa has 8 grams of protein per 1 cup cooked.



Quinoa also has a large amount of fiber (6 grams per 1 cup cooked) that helps:
1.Form stools to prevent diarrhea.
2. Promote regular bowel movements for constipation.
3. Act as a PREbiotic to fuel probiotics for a healthier gut microbiome without the added bloat. 
4. The fiber also helps to stabilize blood sugar, promote heart health, and since it takes longer to digest can keep you fuller for a longer period of time.


Not only does it have a good balance of protein and carbohydrates, but it also has a large variety of micronutrients such as:

  • Manganese- 1.2 milligrams (mg) (58% of daily value)

  • Magnesium (aids constipation) 118 mg (38% of daily value)

  • Phosphorus- 281 mg (28% of daily value)

  • Folate- 77.7 micrograms (19% daily value)

  • Iron-2.8 micrograms (15% daily value)

  • Zinc-2 mg (13% daily value)

How to Cook Quinoa

Quinoa is prepared similar to how you cook rice. Typically, you rinse off the seeds under running water. Then you take 1 cup of quinoa and bring to a boil in 2 cups of water or other liquid. Then let simmer covered for 10-15 minutes.


What is great about Quinoa is that it is very versatile that you can prepare for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. It can be prepared as a sweet or savory dish. Below are 2 simple recipes to make at home.


Strawberry Quinoa Breakfast Bowl


Serving Size: 4

Prep Time: 10-15 minutes


INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup quinoa (extra quinoa)

  • 2 cups of water

  • 1/4 cup of unsweetened almond milk

  • 1 tsp of Pure Maple Syrup

  • 1/4 cup of sliced strawberries

INSTRUCTIONS:

  • Rinse off quinoa under running water.

  • Add water and quinoa in a pot, and bring to a boil.

  • Reduce heat, and allow to simmer, covered for 10-15 minutes.

  • Scoop one cup of quinoa into a bowl.

  • Stir in the almond milk, maple syrup, and strawberries.

  • And serve

Quinoa Summer Salad


Serving Size: 1

Prep Time: 10-15 minutes


INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup quinoa (extra quinoa

  • 2 cups of water

  • 1 cup of raw spinach

  • 1/4 of a medium yellow bell pepper

  • 1/8 of an avocado

  • Juice from 1/2 a lemon

  • 1 tsp of olive oil

INSTRUCTIONS:

  • Rinse off quinoa under running water.

  • Add water and quinoa in a pot, and bring to a boil.

  • Reduce heat, and allow to simmer, covered for 10-15 minutes.

  • Scoop one cup of quinoa into a bowl.

  • Mix in spinach, bell pepper, avocado, lemon juice, and olive oil.

  • Serve