6 Low FODMAP Dinner Recipes for Your Thanksgiving Table

Navigating the Thanksgiving holiday and the variety of food that comes along with it can be a challenge for anyone managing irritable bowel syndrome. This is especially true when following a low FODMAP diet. Take the stress out of planning for the big day by using this simple guide to fill your table with delicious low FODMAP dinner recipes.




What Makes a Recipe Low FODMAP?


Low FODMAP diets look different for everyone since no single ingredient will cause symptoms for every person with irritable bowel syndrome. For a recipe to be considered low FODMAP, it must be free of high FODMAP ingredients and/or use high FODMAP ingredients in the recommended portion sizes to meet low FODMAP requirements. The chart below provides a guide for ingredient swaps to make a recipe meet low FODMAP requirements. It’s best to work with your dietitian to identify which ingredients you’re the most sensitive to while liberalizing the rest of your diet.


3 Steps to Modify a Recipe for a Low FODMAP Diet


1. Assess the Ingredients

If you’ve found a favorite recipe that isn’t low FODMAP then it’s best to start with assessing the ingredients. Make note of those that are high FODMAP and consider their role in the recipe. If more than half of the ingredients are high FODMAP, it may be best to find a different recipe altogether. However, if half or fewer of the ingredients are high FODMAP then it’s worth considering modifications to ensure the recipe meets your needs.


2. Swap Ingredients

Now that you’ve determined that the high FODMAP ingredients make up less than half of the total ingredients, it’s time to consider swapping those higher FODMAP ingredients for low FODMAP ingredients. The chart below provides a simple list of ingredient swaps. For example, if a recipe calls for garlic, swap with garlic infused oil (while also reducing the oil ingredient in the original recipe) to achieve a similar flavor.



3. Reduce the Portion

Another way to ensure a recipe meets your low FODMAP needs is to reduce the portion of the high FODMAP ingredients in the recipe. This only works if the total amount of the high FODMAP ingredients doesn’t exceed the amount you can eat in a single meal. For example, reducing the portion size of the garlic and onion might still result in a combined total of high FODMAP ingredients that exceed the amount recommended for a single meal.


6 Favorite Low FODMAP Dinner Recipes for Your Thanksgiving Table


Note: recipes that aren’t inherently low FODMAP as written have notes for making modifications to meet the low FODMAP diet. Read through the descriptions and tips carefully if you’re on a strict low FODMAP diet.


Cornish Hens with Pumpkin, Purple Potatoes, and Chorizo by Lara Clevenger


If you want to try something other than turkey for your Thanksgiving meal then this recipe is for you. Bonus: the pumpkin and potatoes work as a side, so there’s one less dish for you to prep



Thanksgiving Stuffed Acorn Squash (Vegetarian)

Note: This recipe must be modified to meet the low FODMAP diet requirements. See notes below.

Stuffed squash is a fall favorite and this recipe can act as a main dish or a beautiful side dish to any meal. Make these changes to modify for a low FODMAP diet:

  1. Swap the garlic for a garlic infused oil while also eliminating the olive oil in the recipe. The garlic oil serves as both the flavor enhancer and oil in the dish.

  2. Swap the onion for equal parts green onion (green part only) or the green stalks of leeks.

  3. If sensitive to garlic, onion, or celery in broth, you can try Low FODMAP certified broths.

https://karalydon.com/recipes/thanksgiving-stuffed-acorn-squash-vegetarian/


Sweet and Savory Vegetable Pot Pies

Note: This recipe must be modified to meet the low FODMAP diet requirements. See notes below.

Pot pies are a classic fall favorite, so why not add this recipe to your Thanksgiving favorites? This recipe can be made low FODMAP with a few swaps:

  1. Swap equal parts onion for green onion (green part only) or the green parts of leeks.

  2. Use garlic infused oil in place of half of the olive oil in the recipe and eliminate the garlic cloves.

  3. Sub gluten-free flour in place of wheat flour.

  4. Swap equal parts celery with red or yellow bell peppers.

  5. Use almond milk in place of dairy milk.

  6. Portobello mushrooms for canned mushrooms.

https://agratefulmeal.com/sweet-and-savory-vegetable-pot-pies


Slow Cooker Pot Roast

Spend less time cooking and more time with loved ones with this slow cooked comfort classic. It’s low FODMAP and packed with flavor.

https://www.rikernutritionconsulting.com/post/slow-cooker-pot-roast


Instant Pot Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

Note: This recipe must be modified to meet the low FODMAP diet requirements. This recipe is only recommended for those who can tolerate lactose. See notes below.

Who doesn’t love mac and cheese? The fall twist on a crowd-pleasing dish is perfect for your Thanksgiving table. Make this recipe low FODMAP by swapping regular pasta in favor of gluten-free pasta.

https://karalydon.com/recipes/butternut-squash-mac-and-cheese


Butternut Squash Mexican Skillet

Note: This recipe must be modified to meet the low FODMAP diet requirements. See notes below.

If you’re looking for a one pot recipe that will feed a crowd, look no further than this Mexican skillet featuring butternut squash. Make it low FODMAP with a few modifications:

  1. Swap the onion in favor of green onion (green part only) or leeks.

  2. Use canned lentils rinsed and drained in place of black beans.

  3. Skip the optional salsa topping due to onion and garlic, or you can purchase low FODMAP salsa.

https://peasandhoppiness.com/recipes/2015/10/25/butternut-squash-mexican-skillet


Save these holiday recipes so that you can eat in confidence, and relax and enjoy the day!



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